Sky Heroes: An Activity Reinventing the Constellations View larger

Sky Heroes: An Activity Reinventing the Constellations

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Participants celebrate their heroes by creating connect-the-dot star patterns to represent them.

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Add a Tech Twist Optional: app for learning more about the constellations, such as Star Walk or Sky Map (see)
Hints for uses in your library This lesson plan offers a range of ideas to help participants learn about constellations -- and use their own creativity! Provide each participant with one or more copies of the seasonal "Sky Heroes" Star Charts
Related Links Printable "Sky Heroes" Star Charts
Originating Source This activity comes from the collection “The Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0”, edited by Andrew Fraknoi, and published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (www.astrosociety.org). Made available as part of PBS LearningMedia.
Related Books
[Suggest a book]
Find the Constellation by H.A. Rey
The Stars by H.A. Rey
The Great Canoes in the Sky by Stephen Robert Chadwick and Martin Paviour-Smith
The Seven Sisters of the Pleiades by Munya Andrews
Exploring Constellations, by Sara Latta
See It with a Small Telescope: 101 Cosmic Wonders by Will Kalif
The Secret Galaxy by Fran Hodgkins and Mike Tayloe
Night Sky Watcher by Raman Prinja

Reviews

 
Rating 
Participants Enjoyed the Activity 
Participants Learned from This Activity 
Activity Instructions Were Clear and Easy to Follow 
Would Recommend 
04/09/2019

Pikachu, Creepers, and Captain America, oh my!

This activity really had the creative juices for my normally unimaginative group flowing. I strongly encourage the fictional hero option for younger participants or if you plan to include story writing as part of the activity. The fictional hero option also creates a more synergistic lesson when connecting to the myths that are the basis of most existing constellations. Finding the sky maps to work with was a little tricky since it is on the primary page under Related Links rather than in the activity itself.

I started off dividing my group into three teams of four participants. Each team was provided with a few pages from “Constellation Legends” by Norm McCarter (http://www.tcoe.org/scicon/instructionalguide/constellations.pdf) as samples. After a brief discussion of what constellations are and their history, each member of a team was given a different one of the seasonal night sky options, with the goal of creating at least one constellation for each season with the group sharing a common mythos.

The groups had an absolute blast, and they came up with some really great constellations. One group did a Pokémon theme, with constellations for Pikachu, a Pokèball, and a Team Rocket logo. Another group had a Marvel’s Avengers theme, and the last group focused on Minecraft (the diamond sword constellation was a favorite). Each member also wrote a story about the constellation (or constellations, in several cases). Every participant was excited to take their completed constellations home, with several asking for copies of their partners, so they could try to find THEIR new constellation in the night sky.

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Sky Heroes: An Activity Reinventing the Constellations

Sky Heroes: An Activity Reinventing the Constellations

Participants celebrate their heroes by creating connect-the-dot star patterns to represent them.