Can a Toaster Make Wind? View larger

Can a Toaster Make Wind?

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Children investigate the source of wind. They use a toaster to heat air and observe the movement of a small aluminum foil kite — due to wind!

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Provides classroom connections, key concepts, connections to science standards, and additional resources.

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Add a Tech Twist i. This would be an open entry, where I could type something like: "Try using infrared thermometers to determine the temperature of the water!" ii. I'd like for this to be on the page when there is an entry, but not on the page if there isn't an entry. 1. So, if I've selected "None" for the STEM Tools category, then ideally neither of these options would show up on the page.
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Rating 
Participants Enjoyed the Activity 
Participants Learned from This Activity 
Activity Instructions Were Clear and Easy to Follow 
Would Recommend 
05/01/2018

Best for a Demonstration

I used this activity as an opening demonstration for a library event called “The Power of Wind.” The program was targeted for kids in grades K-6 and their caregivers were invited to stay. The other two activities I did during this event were “Puff Mobiles” and “Wind Streamer.”

This activity did not cost us anything – I used my toaster and some aluminum foil from home and found some wooden skewers in our craft closet that we used in place of the dowel. I was afraid that the kids would drop either the foil or the paperclip into the toaster, so they simply observed while I performed the experiment.

I started the session with a Bill Nye video from YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBqohRu2RRk). This two minute video gave a brief overview of what causes wind. After the video, I followed the steps listed in the activity. The questions and answers provided in the STAR_Net pdf are well written and encouraged discussion as I performed the demonstration. Since I had a large age range, the answers to my questions were very varied and the predictions we polarized. Simply asking “can a toaster make wind?” split the group in half.

The entire demonstration including the video took just under 15 minutes. This activity doesn’t have enough to it for entire library program, but it made for a great introduction to wind and a great lead-in for the other two activities.

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Can a Toaster Make Wind?

Can a Toaster Make Wind?

Children investigate the source of wind. They use a toaster to heat air and observe the movement of a small aluminum foil kite — due to wind!