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What Do You See in Today’s Moon?

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Learners read or listen to a cultural story describing a shape identified in the Moon's surface features.

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    Participants Learned from This Activity 
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Related Programming Resources

Originating Source Lunar and Planetary Instute
NASAWavelength.org
Related Books
[Suggest a book]
Crelin, B. (2009). Faces of the moon. Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge. Grades 1 – 4
Grego, P. (2016). The moon and how to observe it. Firefly Books. (ISBN-13: 978-1770857155) Appropriate for older youth and adults
Courgeon, Remi (2017). Many Moons: Learn about the different phases of the moon. (ISBN-13: 978-1633222984). Appropriate for very young readers.

Reviews

 
Rating 
Participants Enjoyed the Activity 
Participants Learned from This Activity 
Activity Instructions Were Clear and Easy to Follow 
Would Recommend 
05/16/2018

Such a great resource for young, diverse astronomers!

Unlike many of the other activities hosted on the STAR_net Activity Clearinghouse, this is not a craft or hands-on activity designed to intersect with specific core science requirements. Instead, it’s an incredibly expansive, fluid, and flexible cultural program which you can adapt and scale to fit almost any need. I found it incredibly useful to read all of the materials and explore all of the resources while setting up an amateur astronomy club here in rural Montana; one can easily adapt it to feature narratives of local tribal groups, Native Americans, First Nations peoples, and other Indigenous peoples. It’s already designed to work with Polynesian-Hawaiian stories. We have utilized it already several times and in several different ways in our Makerspace programs and at the aforementioned amateur astronomy club, and we have high hopes of bringing in a Salish or Kootenai storyteller to continue utilizing these resources in the future.

And yes, you could utilize any number of relevant crafts and hands-on activities with the “What Do You See in Today’s Moon?” activity. We paired it with Remi Courgeon’s “Many Moons” board book, which provides simple visual comparisons of the moon’s various stages, and then asked kids to draw a stage of the moon and draw its visual comparison, too. A banana? A cat’s tail? A wheel of cheese? The comparisons are endless, and something really clicked when we showed them the waxing-to-waning progression in “Many Moons.”

Many thanks to the Lunar and Planetary Institute for this great resource, and to the STAR_net Activity Clearinghouse for rendering it accessible. This is one we will be returning to many times in the coming years!

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What Do You See in Today’s Moon?

What Do You See in Today’s Moon?

Learners read or listen to a cultural story describing a shape identified in the Moon's surface features.